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Women Composers



Dear Colleagues,

As promised, here is the compilation of responses to my request for
suggestions re:
Significant choral works by women composers



Well- I don't know how significant people think this piece is, but I love it
and it's a great opener!!
At the Round Earth's Imagined Corners by Willametta Spencer

======================= I hope you will include Lili Boulanger's 'Soir sur la Plaine'.

Do you know any Pauline Viardot (nee Garcia) pieces? (She was
daughter of Manuel Garcia, sister of Mary ______ (can't remember, famous
soprano), and sang the premiere of Tristan, as I recall. Berlioz called
her the finest musician of his time, or any other. A lot of her music is
sort of elves and fairies parlor music, but her 'Choeur Bohemien' (on the
PNWCC Romantic Gypsy CD) is fiery. Must have been phenomenal when
performed by her and her sister. The piece, virtuosos but not profound,
gives a distinct view of Viardot's own time, place, and vocal
capabilities.
==========================
Oxford publishes major works by Libby Larsen, Rebecca Clarke, Hilary
Tann, and Phyllis Tate, among others. Please let us know if we can
supply you with materials to consider.

With best wishes,
Christopher Johnson
Senior Editor and Manager
Music Department
Oxford University Press
198 Madison Avenue
New York NY 10016-4314

=============Anything by Hildegard of Bingen.

===============
If you're interested in doing a bit of research you'll find helpful
information on the International Alliance for Women in Music site:
http://150.252.8.92/www/iawm/ J. Michele Edwards' list will be of
particular interest.

=========================
Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (Gartenlieder?)
Libby Larsen
Gwyneth Walker
Emma Lou Diemer

===================First on my list of works by women:

Grand Mass in E-flat by Amy Beach -
accessible, monumental, appealing -
we performed the Midwest Premiere
in 1998.

============
Lili Boulanger, Psalm 130 ("De profundis," or "Du fond de l'abîme"), for sure.
Full mixed chorus and orchestra, with mezzo solo, cantata-length.
Boulanger, Lili. Du fond de l'abime. Durand, D.& F.10543. SATB, at, org, orch
[26:00; ; rec - Intaglio INCD 703-1; text: Psalm 130]


==============Anything by Hildegarde of Bingen -- we sang the O Frondens Virga (Treble Clef
Press) last semester -- very beautiful. We are doing Lili Boulanger's Les
Sirenes next Fall (also Treble Clef Press) and there is a Mass in Eb by Amy
Beach -- I think Hildegarde Publishing in Phila. publishes that.

===================
Boulanger, Lili. Psaume 24 (1916). Durand, D. & F. 10481 & 10488. SATB, org,
orch. [4:00; French & English text in score; rec - Intaglio INCD 703-1]


Leonarda, Isabella. Beatus vir, op. 19. A-R Edition, Recent Researches in the
Music of the Baroque Era, vol. 59. SATB, satb, 2 vn, continuo (violone,
tiorbo, org) Leonarda, Isabella. Kyrie, op. 4. A-R Edition, Recent Researches
in the Music of the Baroque Era, vol. 59. SATB, 2 vn, continuo ([vc], org)
Leonarda, Isabella. Messa Prima, op. 18. SATB, satb, 2 vn, vc, org. ClarNan
Editions, 235 Baxter Lane, Fayetteville, AK 72701, CN1: 2nd ed. [3 mov'ts
only; Kyrie - 5:15; Gloria - 17:00; Credo - 19:00; ranges are modest so can be
done with 2 soloists; 2 obs & bn also work well; rec - Leonarda LPI 115 (LP)]

Amy Beach - Mass in Eb, Op. 5 "Grand Mass" (1891). [Newport Classic NCD 60008]

Lili Boulanger - Choral Songs; Du Fond de l'Abime. [Intaglio INCD 703]

Lili Boulanger. Psalm 24; Pie Jesu; Du Fond De L'Abime, on CD titled Boulanger
& Fauré Sacred Music. BBC Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, INCD 703-0.

Clearly, anything at all by Hildegard, even though her actual influence is
pretty much limited to the past 15 or 20 years. Hers was a unique and
personal voice that illuminates both the "standard" sacred music and the
growing secular songs of her century.
==================
I would have to say that Alice Parker of this century and Fanny Mendelssohn
Hensel of the 19th century are two of the most notible. Also Hildegard of
Bingen during Medival times(I don't have a specific date) was influential.
I don't think that Clara Schumann wrote choral pieces, but her leider is
wonderful.

====================I would difinitely use something by Alice Parker, also Ruth Seeger's
Chant (very difficault), secular songs by Fannie Mendelssohn Hensel;
Maybe Mabel Daniels "Piper, Play on" something by Reichardt, maybe Libby
Larsen, Aleotti sisters. This is a good start. Keep me posted.
=================
I'd vote for Quebec May, SATB and 2 pianos, by Jean Coulthard, published
by Waterloo Music Co.Ltd, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Coulthard has been a
fairly prolific composer for choir [see Linda Black's recent dissertation
at Florida University]; I think Quebec May is an especially attractive
work in a "conservative" 20th century idiom: very evocative lyrical
materials and effective and exciting rhythmic ideas. There is also a
version for choir and orchestra recorded by the Elmer Isler Singers of
Toronto, though the 2 piano version was the "original".
==============
I'd nominate 2 works:

1. Missa Brevis (SATB) by Toronto composer Ruth Watson Henderson
(Warner/Chappell Music Canada VEI1040)

and

2. Requiem (SATB) by Toronto composer Eleanor Daley
(Warner/Chappell Music Canada VEI1146)

Both are (I believe) part of the Elmer Iseler Collection.

For more information about Eleanor Daley please visit our web site at
http://amadeus.idirect.com
==============
Try the "Missa Brevis" by Nancy Telfer, 1985
Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, Agnus Dei
SSA

=================
THE SKY SPEAKS, for 8 part chorus, mezzo-soprano (or lyric soprano),cello,
2 percussion & piano by

Vivian Adelberg Rudow
===================Without a doubt, Hildegard of course. According to Mary Lycan in her
catalogue, my piece Hodie is "a significant contribution to women's choral
literature of the 20th century." Quote may not be exact, but it's approximate.
So I need to put in a vote for my own piece.
Thanks, Naomi stephan
=========================
How about Ethel Smyth's "Mass" (SATB soloists, choir and orchestra, 1893) -
reprinted by Da Capo Press, I think.
Or Smyth's "Hey Nonny No" (I cannot recall if this is unaccompanied, or what
the voices are?? 1912?) Gustav Holst was a fan of this work ...

=====================
I'm certain that you'll get quite a few great responses by people more
knowledgeable that me about Women composers, but I thought I'd mention a
composer named Beatriz Corona. She is Cuban, and has a wonderful a cappella
piece called Corazon, coraza. ("Heart Armor") which is featured on "Exaudi"
Chamber CHoir's CD. It is about 3' long and very rich- almost choral jazz.
The text (spanish) is about lost love. -It's sentimental in a nice way. I
don't know about publishing information- I've been trying to get a hold of
the piece myself.

It is hardly a "choral great" - but I thought a non-traditional piece might
fit nicely in a program of Hildegard, Clara Schumann, Fanny Mendelssohn,
Thea Musgrave, Amy Beach etc....

=================
My favorite is Fanny Hensel Mendelssohn - she wrote fantastic a capella
pieces for mixed choir!

========================
You MUST consider Jean Belmont to be one of the leading contemporary female
composers. If you are not familiar with her music, you can hear some her
songs on The Kansas City Chorale's recording, "Fern Hill." "If Music Be the
Food of Love" is one of her jewels but it is not on the recording. One of her
more recent big works is "Electa". It is for SATB with several divisi, and
requires a very skilled soprano soloist and percussionist. It tells the
magnificat text in a very compelling way. This piece is published by Roger
Dean and is very demanding. If you are truly interested in it, please contact
me and I will send a performance tape of it. Jean also has some other cycles,
namely The Bells which was performed frequently by Elmer Eisler, Nativitas,
the title of the Choral'es first CD, and Songs of Memory, again published by
Roger Dean. These Songs use a flute and drummer. Her "Farewell Overture" is
a perfect closer or encore.

Another new piece that I am really high about is "Psalm 15" by Latvian
composer, Maija Einfelde. The piece is still in manuscript and I would be
happy to send you a copy and tape if you like. Maija won last year's
International Barlow competition for composition. As a part of the
commission, performances were given by the Vancouver Chamber Choir, Brigham
Young University Choir, The Netherlands Radio Chorus and The Kansas City
Chorale. This piece is very demanding but well worth the effort. It was very
meaningful for the Chorale to participate in this arena.

I'm sure you are well aware of Libby Larsen.
===========
In response to your query, if you are able to consider works with
orchestral accompaniment, one of the most profound, & profoundly moving,
works I've ever experienced -- written by anyone from any time period -- is
"Du fond du l'abime" (Psalm 130) by Lili Boulanger. Were I a conductor, &
could arrange for adequate performing forces, I would do *everything*
within my power & abilities to perform this at least once in my life-time!
Don't have publisher info' immediately on-hand, but could probably find it
with a bit of research, if you need.

===============
Ethel Smyth's arresting _Mass in D_ comes to mind (Novello, 1893).
There's also her rhythmical chorus _Hey Nonny No_ (Breitkopf and Hartel,
1911), difficult, but rewarding if got right.

===========
Several pieces by Lili Boulanger
Ethel Smyth's Mass
Miriam Gideon's large Sacred Service
Louis Talma's three settings of e.e. cummings (especially "Let's touch
the sky')
Thea Musgrave's Rorate Coeli

and from my own output, probably the dramatic cantata PARABLE: A Tale of
Abram and Isaac (pub. by Hildegard; with an excerpt in the 2nd Briscoe
anthology).


= Scholars will be your be your best resource, I think, with specific
titles drawn from composers from many countries. What's intersting to note
is how the 20th century has moved choral music so somewhat of a back burner,
favoring pure instrumental composition and opera at the fore (with dramatic
song also in there).

===============
I can recommend an excellent CD of choral works by Lili
Boulanger, Fanny Mendelssohn, and Clara Schumann -- it's on the Bayer
label, and the numbers I have listed for it are 8498 and 100 041 [sorry, I
don't know which of these is the album number]. This is one of my favorite
recordings in any category of music. [It also includes gorgeous
performances of four Lili B. songs.] On this CD you'll find several works
that are very significant aesthetically/historically, in my opinion,
including a very interesting, little-known 8-part Fanny piece. The LB
works are readily available, I think from Ricordi; the German pieces may be
more difficult to access but may still be well worth looking into.

=========================
I would recommend a review of the G.C. Schirmer Anthology of Women Composers.
This anthology provides specific examples of works by women from the 9th
Century (Kassia) on. Once you identify a piece of interest, Hildegard
Publishing of Bryn Mawr PA publishes individual copies. Some suggestions:

O virga ac diadema- Hildegard of Bingen

Include anything by:
Barbara Strozzi- she wrote some SATB repertory
Francesca Caccini
One or more of the 17th Century Italian Nun composers, especially Isabella
Leonarda

As for 20th Century, I'm less familiar, but would include:
Libby Larsen
Meredith Monk (if you can get a score)





Choralisters,
You all might want to know that Karen Thomas, the Seattle
composer and conductor who posted this initial inquiry, also might have
included some of her own works! I have conducted her excellent Stabat
Mater setting for voices and small chamber ensemble, and I now am
rehearsing her Jaymar publications of her SATB settings of 'Alice' texts
(which are charming).

JCConlon
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Joan Catoni Conlon Phone: (303) 492-6403
College of Music FAX: (303) 492-5619
18th and Euclid email: conlonj(a)stripe.Colorado.edu
Campus Box 301
University of Colorado
Boulder, CO 80309-0301

On Mon, 8 Mar 1999 Kpthomas1(a)aol.com wrote:

> Dear Colleagues,
>
> As promised, here is the compilation of responses to my request for
> suggestions re:
> Significant choral works by women composers
>
>
>
> Well- I don't know how significant people think this piece is, but I love it
> and it's a great opener!!
> At the Round Earth's Imagined Corners by Willametta Spencer
>
> =======================> I hope you will include Lili Boulanger's 'Soir sur la Plaine'.
>
> Do you know any Pauline Viardot (nee Garcia) pieces? (She was
> daughter of Manuel Garcia, sister of Mary ______ (can't remember, famous
> soprano), and sang the premiere of Tristan, as I recall. Berlioz called
> her the finest musician of his time, or any other. A lot of her music is
> sort of elves and fairies parlor music, but her 'Choeur Bohemien' (on the
> PNWCC Romantic Gypsy CD) is fiery. Must have been phenomenal when
> performed by her and her sister. The piece, virtuosos but not profound,
> gives a distinct view of Viardot's own time, place, and vocal
> capabilities.
> ==========================>
> Oxford publishes major works by Libby Larsen, Rebecca Clarke, Hilary
> Tann, and Phyllis Tate, among others. Please let us know if we can
> supply you with materials to consider.
>
> With best wishes,
> Christopher Johnson
> Senior Editor and Manager
> Music Department
> Oxford University Press
> 198 Madison Avenue
> New York NY 10016-4314
>
> =============> Anything by Hildegard of Bingen.
>
> ===============>
> If you're interested in doing a bit of research you'll find helpful
> information on the International Alliance for Women in Music site:
> http://150.252.8.92/www/iawm/ J. Michele Edwards' list will be of
> particular interest.
>
> =========================>
> Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (Gartenlieder?)
> Libby Larsen
> Gwyneth Walker
> Emma Lou Diemer
>
> ===================> First on my list of works by women:
>
> Grand Mass in E-flat by Amy Beach -
> accessible, monumental, appealing -
> we performed the Midwest Premiere
> in 1998.
>
> ============>
> Lili Boulanger, Psalm 130 ("De profundis," or "Du fond de l'abîme"), for sure.
> Full mixed chorus and orchestra, with mezzo solo, cantata-length.
> Boulanger, Lili. Du fond de l'abime. Durand, D.& F.10543. SATB, at, org, orch
> [26:00; ; rec - Intaglio INCD 703-1; text: Psalm 130]
>
>
> ==============> Anything by Hildegarde of Bingen -- we sang the O Frondens Virga (Treble Clef
> Press) last semester -- very beautiful. We are doing Lili Boulanger's Les
> Sirenes next Fall (also Treble Clef Press) and there is a Mass in Eb by Amy
> Beach -- I think Hildegarde Publishing in Phila. publishes that.
>
> ====================>
>
> Boulanger, Lili. Psaume 24 (1916). Durand, D. & F. 10481 & 10488. SATB, org,
> orch. [4:00; French & English text in score; rec - Intaglio INCD 703-1]
>
>
> Leonarda, Isabella. Beatus vir, op. 19. A-R Edition, Recent Researches in the
> Music of the Baroque Era, vol. 59. SATB, satb, 2 vn, continuo (violone,
> tiorbo, org) Leonarda, Isabella. Kyrie, op. 4. A-R Edition, Recent Researches
> in the Music of the Baroque Era, vol. 59. SATB, 2 vn, continuo ([vc], org)
> Leonarda, Isabella. Messa Prima, op. 18. SATB, satb, 2 vn, vc, org. ClarNan
> Editions, 235 Baxter Lane, Fayetteville, AK 72701, CN1: 2nd ed. [3 mov'ts
> only; Kyrie - 5:15; Gloria - 17:00; Credo - 19:00; ranges are modest so can be
> done with 2 soloists; 2 obs & bn also work well; rec - Leonarda LPI 115 (LP)]
>
> Amy Beach - Mass in Eb, Op. 5 "Grand Mass" (1891). [Newport Classic NCD 60008]
>
> Lili Boulanger - Choral Songs; Du Fond de l'Abime. [Intaglio INCD 703]
>
> Lili Boulanger. Psalm 24; Pie Jesu; Du Fond De L'Abime, on CD titled Boulanger
> & Fauré Sacred Music. BBC Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, INCD 703-0.
>
> Clearly, anything at all by Hildegard, even though her actual influence is
> pretty much limited to the past 15 or 20 years. Hers was a unique and
> personal voice that illuminates both the "standard" sacred music and the
> growing secular songs of her century.
> ==================>
> I would have to say that Alice Parker of this century and Fanny Mendelssohn
> Hensel of the 19th century are two of the most notible. Also Hildegard of
> Bingen during Medival times(I don't have a specific date) was influential.
> I don't think that Clara Schumann wrote choral pieces, but her leider is
> wonderful.
>
> ====================> I would difinitely use something by Alice Parker, also Ruth Seeger's
> Chant (very difficault), secular songs by Fannie Mendelssohn Hensel;
> Maybe Mabel Daniels "Piper, Play on" something by Reichardt, maybe Libby
> Larsen, Aleotti sisters. This is a good start. Keep me posted.
> =================>
> I'd vote for Quebec May, SATB and 2 pianos, by Jean Coulthard, published
> by Waterloo Music Co.Ltd, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Coulthard has been a
> fairly prolific composer for choir [see Linda Black's recent dissertation
> at Florida University]; I think Quebec May is an especially attractive
> work in a "conservative" 20th century idiom: very evocative lyrical
> materials and effective and exciting rhythmic ideas. There is also a
> version for choir and orchestra recorded by the Elmer Isler Singers of
> Toronto, though the 2 piano version was the "original".
> ===============>
>
> I'd nominate 2 works:
>
> 1. Missa Brevis (SATB) by Toronto composer Ruth Watson Henderson
> (Warner/Chappell Music Canada VEI1040)
>
> and
>
> 2. Requiem (SATB) by Toronto composer Eleanor Daley
> (Warner/Chappell Music Canada VEI1146)
>
> Both are (I believe) part of the Elmer Iseler Collection.
>
> For more information about Eleanor Daley please visit our web site at
> http://amadeus.idirect.com
> ==============>
> Try the "Missa Brevis" by Nancy Telfer, 1985
> Kyrie, Gloria, Sanctus, Agnus Dei
> SSA
>
> =================>
> THE SKY SPEAKS, for 8 part chorus, mezzo-soprano (or lyric soprano),cello,
> 2 percussion & piano by
>
> Vivian Adelberg Rudow
> ===================> Without a doubt, Hildegard of course. According to Mary Lycan in her
> catalogue, my piece Hodie is "a significant contribution to women's choral
> literature of the 20th century." Quote may not be exact, but it's approximate.
> So I need to put in a vote for my own piece.
> Thanks, Naomi stephan
> =========================>
> How about Ethel Smyth's "Mass" (SATB soloists, choir and orchestra, 1893) -
> reprinted by Da Capo Press, I think.
> Or Smyth's "Hey Nonny No" (I cannot recall if this is unaccompanied, or what
> the voices are?? 1912?) Gustav Holst was a fan of this work ...
>
> ======================>
>
> I'm certain that you'll get quite a few great responses by people more
> knowledgeable that me about Women composers, but I thought I'd mention a
> composer named Beatriz Corona. She is Cuban, and has a wonderful a cappella
> piece called Corazon, coraza. ("Heart Armor") which is featured on "Exaudi"
> Chamber CHoir's CD. It is about 3' long and very rich- almost choral jazz.
> The text (spanish) is about lost love. -It's sentimental in a nice way. I
> don't know about publishing information- I've been trying to get a hold of
> the piece myself.
>
> It is hardly a "choral great" - but I thought a non-traditional piece might
> fit nicely in a program of Hildegard, Clara Schumann, Fanny Mendelssohn,
> Thea Musgrave, Amy Beach etc....
>
> =================>
> My favorite is Fanny Hensel Mendelssohn - she wrote fantastic a capella
> pieces for mixed choir!
>
> ========================>
> You MUST consider Jean Belmont to be one of the leading contemporary female
> composers. If you are not familiar with her music, you can hear some her
> songs on The Kansas City Chorale's recording, "Fern Hill." "If Music Be the
> Food of Love" is one of her jewels but it is not on the recording. One of her
> more recent big works is "Electa". It is for SATB with several divisi, and
> requires a very skilled soprano soloist and percussionist. It tells the
> magnificat text in a very compelling way. This piece is published by Roger
> Dean and is very demanding. If you are truly interested in it, please contact
> me and I will send a performance tape of it. Jean also has some other cycles,
> namely The Bells which was performed frequently by Elmer Eisler, Nativitas,
> the title of the Choral'es first CD, and Songs of Memory, again published by
> Roger Dean. These Songs use a flute and drummer. Her "Farewell Overture" is
> a perfect closer or encore.
>
> Another new piece that I am really high about is "Psalm 15" by Latvian
> composer, Maija Einfelde. The piece is still in manuscript and I would be
> happy to send you a copy and tape if you like. Maija won last year's
> International Barlow competition for composition. As a part of the
> commission, performances were given by the Vancouver Chamber Choir, Brigham
> Young University Choir, The Netherlands Radio Chorus and The Kansas City
> Chorale. This piece is very demanding but well worth the effort. It was very
> meaningful for the Chorale to participate in this arena.
>
> I'm sure you are well aware of Libby Larsen.
> ============>
>
> In response to your query, if you are able to consider works with
> orchestral accompaniment, one of the most profound, & profoundly moving,
> works I've ever experienced -- written by anyone from any time period -- is
> "Du fond du l'abime" (Psalm 130) by Lili Boulanger. Were I a conductor, &
> could arrange for adequate performing forces, I would do *everything*
> within my power & abilities to perform this at least once in my life-time!
> Don't have publisher info' immediately on-hand, but could probably find it
> with a bit of research, if you need.
>
> ===============>
> Ethel Smyth's arresting _Mass in D_ comes to mind (Novello, 1893).
> There's also her rhythmical chorus _Hey Nonny No_ (Breitkopf and Hartel,
> 1911), difficult, but rewarding if got right.
>
> ===========>
> Several pieces by Lili Boulanger
> Ethel Smyth's Mass
> Miriam Gideon's large Sacred Service
> Louis Talma's three settings of e.e. cummings (especially "Let's touch
> the sky')
> Thea Musgrave's Rorate Coeli
>
> and from my own output, probably the dramatic cantata PARABLE: A Tale of
> Abram and Isaac (pub. by Hildegard; with an excerpt in the 2nd Briscoe
> anthology).
>
>
> = Scholars will be your be your best resource, I think, with specific
> titles drawn from composers from many countries. What's intersting to note
> is how the 20th century has moved choral music so somewhat of a back burner,
> favoring pure instrumental composition and opera at the fore (with dramatic
> song also in there).
>
> ===============>
> I can recommend an excellent CD of choral works by Lili
> Boulanger, Fanny Mendelssohn, and Clara Schumann -- it's on the Bayer
> label, and the numbers I have listed for it are 8498 and 100 041 [sorry, I
> don't know which of these is the album number]. This is one of my favorite
> recordings in any category of music. [It also includes gorgeous
> performances of four Lili B. songs.] On this CD you'll find several works
> that are very significant aesthetically/historically, in my opinion,
> including a very interesting, little-known 8-part Fanny piece. The LB
> works are readily available, I think from Ricordi; the German pieces may be
> more difficult to access but may still be well worth looking into.
>
> =========================>
> I would recommend a review of the G.C. Schirmer Anthology of Women Composers.
> This anthology provides specific examples of works by women from the 9th
> Century (Kassia) on. Once you identify a piece of interest, Hildegard
> Publishing of Bryn Mawr PA publishes individual copies. Some suggestions:
>
> O virga ac diadema- Hildegard of Bingen
>
> Include anything by:
> Barbara Strozzi- she wrote some SATB repertory
> Francesca Caccini
> One or more of the 17th Century Italian Nun composers, especially Isabella
> Leonarda
>
> As for 20th Century, I'm less familiar, but would include:
> Libby Larsen
> Meredith Monk (if you can get a score)
>
>
>

Dear Choralisters:

I've been asked to provide a compilation of replies I received re my letter of last week asking about pieces by women composers for an SSA/SSAA choir concert I'm programming for this spring. Here are the suggestions I've received so far (as of Thursday afternoon, Dec. 27):

You should certainly program something by Libby Larsen, America's preeminent woman composer. She has many works for women's voices, some accompanied and some a capella, and of varying lengths. Google her website and you will find loads of wonderful pieces for treble ensembles. Good luck.


I have a work for SSAA a cappella that was commissioned by SHE (an all women's a cappella group in NYC). If you are interested in considering the work, I would be more than happy to send along a score.


I can highly recommend the works of two women composers with similar last names:
1. Jeanie Brindley-Barnett has composed a number of works for SSAA and a variety of accompaniments from piano to full orchestra. She is best known for her "Butterfly Songs", settings of the poetry of children who were imprisoned in Terezín Concentration Camp during the Holocaust. Some of the 10 song cycle have been set for SSAA. Please contact Jeanie at >adarmusltd(a)aol.com
2. Carol Barnett is another fine composer I would recommend getting in contact with. A number of her works are set for SSAA and have women's themes and/or lyricists. Carol was composer in residence with the Dale Warland Singers for over 10 years. Carol's e-mail address is:
>carol(a)carolbarnett.net
I'm sure that you will get many other choices like Libby Larsen, Abbie Betinis, Jan Vandervelde, Edie Hill and so many other fine women composers.


I highly recommend "Angel in Eternal Flight" by Valerie Webdell. My women's choir has used this as their traditional closer of the spring concert for a couple of years now. We always invite alumni from the group to join us. It is gorgeous!



Please feel free to look at our website where we list all of the
repertoire that we have done. Perhaps something might interest you.

www.voxfeminala.org

From the front page, click on "About Us" and then you will see the
repertoire link at the top.

We are a women's community choir that started in 1997 and have
commissioned 20 new works to date. We sing in a variety of styles
and languages.

I hope you find something that might interest you.

Our website (www.ocwomenschorus.org) has a complete list of everything we've sung for the past ten years, and there's plenty of repertoire by women composers. Take a look; if any particular pieces sound interesting and you'd like to know more about them, please feel free to ask!

Eliza Rubenstein
Artistic Director
Orange County Women's Chorus
www.ocwomenschorus.org




The piece that readily comes to m ind is a female arranger-- Gwyneth Walker "How Can I keep From Singing".... wonderful piece of music IMHO :-)


Chasing the northern lights, by nancy telfer. Very doable and fresh. Based on different vowel shaping. GORGEOUS piece


You and your ensemble might like "Hebrides Lullaby" by American composer Gwyneth Walker. I enjoyed performing this a few weeks ago with CONCORA, Connecticut's premier professional choir (www.concora.org). However, the work should be OK for your choir. It is scored for SSA with mezzo or alto solo.


Eleanor Daley: Rise up, my love; She's like the swallow.
LoriAnn Dolloff: The Castle of Dromore.
Ruth Watson Henderson: Three Maritime Folk Songs
Janet Kidd: Back to the River St. John.
Nancy Telfer: I'se the B'y; Sing me a song; The Swallow.
Stella terHart: She's like the swallow; Willow Tree.


I would encourage you to try something by Emma Lou Diemer. She has a nice set of Emily Dickinson poems entitled Hope is the thing with feathers (listed below). Also, there is another set of Fragments from the Mass. She has many other works which are listed in Schlegel, Ellen Grolman. Emma Lou Diemer: A Bio-Bibliography. Bio-Bibliographies in Music, Series Adviser

Donald L. Hixon, no. 84. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2001.

An Emily Dickinson Suite ("Hope is the thing with feathers") for SSA and keyboard, 2000, moderate difficulty. (Treble Clef Music Press, 2002).

Commissioned and premiered by Bella Voce/Sierra Women's Ensemble (Reno, Nevada) April, 2001.



Contact Mary Lycan at Treble Clef Music Press in North Carolina. Mary is a top-notch scholar and conductor who publishes lots of music of all descriptions. Most of it is composed or arranged by women and intended for treble choir. You'll find everything you need from her catalog.


I'm sure you've already thought of Hildegard. With my compliments, here is a copy of one of her pieces.



Thank you, everyone, for your great suggestions. I'll post any additional info I receive on the subject.


Ann Kapp Andersen
8987 Bob Smith Road
Lava Hot Springs, Idaho 83246
akatunesmith(a)yahoo.com
See my new website for choral music, song cycles, solos and duets:
www.annkappandersen.com




on March 2, 2012 8:51am
Another list to peruse...with works for women's voices, by women composers and women poets.

"By Women, For Women: Choral Works for Women's Voices Composed and Texted by Women"

Includes annotations on 150+ women's chorus pieces, all by women composers/poets.
The file is available via PDF at:
Https://public.me.com/shelbielwahl

Enjoy!

Shelbie L. Wahl, D.A.
Director of Choral Activites
Hollins University
Roanoke, VA