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Praetorius Magnificat--which one?

I am writing my organization's history, and we are fortunate enough to have unearthed nearly every concert program for 60 years.
 
There were three different concerts that held Praetorius "Magnificat".
 
Two are clearly labeled Praetorius Magnificat #2.
 
The third is labeled only Praetorius Magnificat.  I'd like to confirm if it's the Magnificat #2.
 
The director's notes in that program say it was written in 1611, is sung unaccompanied, and
 
"The odd-numbered verses arc given in Gregorian Chant. while the even-numbered verses, by contrast. are sung in
imitative polyphony. so representative of this epoch in the history of music.
 
"What sets the composition apart from others using the same favorite and well known words is Praetorius's reference to Christmas carols of his day. After each couplet of Latin verses, the composer has introduced a carol sung in the vernacular language."
 
Does that sound like Magnificat #2? 
 
Gail Mrozak
Elmhurst Choral Union
elmhurstchoralunion.org
on August 16, 2013 2:59am
That description covers pretty much any renaissance setting of the Magnificat (apart from the carols, obviously!). The Praetorius Mag with carol interpolations (Joseph Lieber and In Dulci Jubilo) is the one on the 5th tone.
Best wishes
Chris
on August 19, 2013 7:03pm
Actually, the carol interpolations are not an uncommon feature in German Magnificats from this time. Scheidt has a boatload of 'em in one of his settings.
 
The more important question is *which* Praetorious? I suspect that you are talking about the relatively well known Magnificat Quinti Toni by Hieronymus Praetorius that can be found in DDT. There is actually another version of it that has recently been recorded that is pretty cool. Michael Praetorius (the *default* Praetorius) has some nice Mag settings as well. Of course, there are also Jacob Praetorious I and II, as well as Barthold Praetorious. I suspect they all have Mag setttings, too, though I have not heard or seen them. There is a wonderful recording of some Jacob II's motets by Weser Renaissance. Definitely worth a listen.
 
Jeff DeMarco
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