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SATB: with Percussion

Date: Sat, 23 Aug 97 20:59:28 -0700
From: Fabiana Katz-Eser
Subject: SATB & percussion compilation (LONG)

Dear listers,

Thank you all for your input in my search. For those who expressed the interest, and those might yet be interested, a list of your answers follow -- in no particular order. This will also complement the past compilation for SATB/perc. music which appeared in choralist a wwhile back.

Thank you again for your ideas.

Fabiana Katz-Eser

---------------------------
SATB choir and percussion
--------------------------
Bernstein: Missa Brevis
David Gillingham: Return to Innocence; publ. Moon of Hope
Argento: I hate and I love
Stravinsky: Les Noces (piano as perc?)
Orff: Carmina Burana (piano/percussion)
Susa: carols and lullabies (marima, vibes, harp, guitar - ECS)
Batastini, arr.: (GIA) Patapan (flute, snare, drum)
Gregory Rose, arr.: Five Spanish Carols (perc. can be added) - Oxford X311
John Gardner: Tomorrow shall be my dancing day (tamb., drum) - OUP
Perischetti: Winter Cantata (SSAA, marimba, flute)
Leavitt: Hodie
Steve Barnett: Go tell it on the mountain (various options) - B&H OCTB6396
V. Nelhybel: Estampie Natalie
W.H. Parry: To Bethlehem (adaptable to avail. forces) - OUP
Z. Randall Stroope: Hodie (large instr. forces plus children¹s chorus - Marc Foster
Lloyd Pfautsch: Dancing day (fl, ob., bsn, perc.)
??: Betelehemu (African Xmas, congas, bongos, shakers, claves) -
Lawson Gould
Dave and Iola Brubeck: God¹s Love made visible
Alexandru Pascanu: Festum hibernum: Ancient Cyclic Customs (Festival of Winter) (satb w. divisi, perc.: sonagli, frusta, campane) - Musica Romanica
Wendell Whalum: Betelehemu (adaptable to forces) - Lawson-Gould 52647
Malcolm V. Edwards: Tomorrow shall be my dancinc day (GV Thompson VA4019)
R. Kauffman: African Noel (Elkan-Vogel 362-03288) SSATBB (opt. perc.)
Arnold Freed: Where were you bron, O holy child (B&H 5620) (opt. perc.)
Alice Parker: 3 Carols to play and sing (hand-bells or chimes, triangle, woodblock, tamb., cymbal, tenor drum, org.)
1. In Bethlehem (2779 - Boosey?)
2. I saw a stable (2780)
3. Shrill Chanticleer (2781)
David McIntyre: Personent Hodie (2 fl., hand drum) (Thomas House)
Innumerable Spanish Villancicos can use ad lib perc.
Ariel Ramirez: Misa Criolla (colorful mix of Latin American perc.
Lloyd Pfautsch: A Day for Dancing (winds and percussion)
Ronald Kauffmann: African Noel (wood block and bongos) (Elkan-Vogel 362-03288)
arr. Gregory Rose: Five Spanish Carols (percussion) (Oxford, X311)
arr. Batastini: Patapan (flute, snare drum) (GIA)
John Mochnik: Three Medieval Carols (Mark Foster)
Ben Alaway: Three Christmas Villancicos (harp/piano and percussion) (Santa Barbara)
John Rutter: Tomorrow shall be my dancing day (percussion)
Dede Duson: The Wind for SATB and timpani.
Ben Allaway: Bandari (African)(Santa Barbara)
David Fanshawe: African Sanctus (Hal Leonard) (prerecorded tape, and optional electric instruments as well as percussion
Ron Nelson: Psalm 95 Come Let Us Praise Yahwey
Andre Thomas: Keep Your Lamps (tri-tom, finger cymbals, etc.)
Andre Thomas: African Noel
Lou Harrison: La Koro Sutro for SATB and Gamelan
Peter Hallock: Gloria (Walton pub.)-- (3 percussionists, piano)
Ernst Toch: Waltz for "talking choir" and percussion
Penderecki: Psalms of David
Brent Pierce: Beat Beat Drums
Peter Hallock: Gloria in Excelsis Deo (extended 3-movement work)
Forsyth: "Music for Mouths, Marimba, Mbira and Rototoms"
Mathias: "Ceremony after a Fire Raid"
Abraham Kaplan: Psalm settings (and other works)
Rutter: Magnificat
Eric Whitacre: "Cloudburst" for SATB divisi choir, two sets of orch. bells (or handbells), thunder sheet, bass drum, piano,
clapping
Donald Erb: God Love You Now (Merion 342-40099)

Date: Sun, 15 Feb 1998 18:41:48 -0500
From: Peter Hobbs
Subject: Summary: Choir+Brass; Choir+Percussion

Here is a summary of replies to my Feb. 12 repertoire query.

First - works for choir + brass:

>From Leonard Ratzlaff: 2 unpublished works by Imant Raminsh: "Veni Sancte
Spiritus" for double chorus, brass octet, timpani and organ and "Veni
Creator Spiritus" for choir and brass
quintet.

>From Ken Langer http://plainfield.bypass.com/~klanger : I am a composer of
choir and brass music. I have a few compositions for brass quintet and
choir if you would be interested.

From: Dan Ratelle: Try the Prague Te Deum, by Petr Eben, for SATB Chorus,
brass quartet and timpani (or alternatively organ)), pub. by Schott. I
think a moderate-large size group would be best.
________________

Second - works for choir + percussion:

>From James D. Feiszli: Did you also check the lists in the CRS?
(Yes, I did -- after you reminded me to, and found a sizable list of works
for choir and percussion. I would be glad to post it to anyone interested.)

>From David Griggs-Janower: Argento - I hate and I love - chorus and two
percs; David Maslanka - Litany of Courage for the Seasons - chor, vibe, clar.

>From Fred Ford: Penderecki "Psalms of David", choir and percussion.

>From Vern Sanders: Ron Sindelar, "Medusa, the Ship", published by Walton,
for large choir, percussion and tape.

>From Dr. David Bohn (Mark Foster Music Company): Lynn Shurtleff , "Echoes
from Hungry Mountain" for choir and (I think) multiple percussionists.

We also have just published a piece by the Haitian Composer Emile Desamours
that is flexible in its scoring: a cappella choir, or choir with one or
more of the following: piano, bass, two percussionists.

>From Russel O Carlson: Mack Wilberg has published many works for SATB
Choir, Brass, and
Percussion. Here are some of them:

Published by Hinshaw Music:
Anthem of Peace - SATB Chorus, Brass, and Percussion
Redeemer of Israel - SATB Chorus, Brass, Percussion, and Organ
Tre Cantus Laudendi - SATB Chorus, Brass, Percussion, and Organ

Published by Oxford University Press:
Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing - SATB, Brass, Percussion, and
Organ

Thank you all for your help. I have passed the information on to Lydia
Adams, our conductor.

Peter Hobbs
The Amadeus Choir
hobbs(a)idirect.com










Here is a compilation of the information I received about choir and
percussion.
Thanks to all who replied.


-------------------------------
I recall a set of pieces published by E.C. Schirmer about the sun. I cannot
remember the title, but I think the composer is a 20th-century American. As
I recall the text was or dealt with Indians (native So. Americans)?
William J. Bullock

"Cloudburst" by Eric Whiteacre is a fabulous setting of an Octavio Paz
poem. It requires cymbal, windchimes, bass drum and handbells.
C. Delange

"Two Psalms" by Robert Kreutz (American) - a terrific work in 2 movements.
It is for SATB and marimba. The marimbist needs to be quite proficient. The
original publisher was Contemporary Music Project, however I believe that
they have since gone out of business.
I also have conducted Arvo Part's "De profundis." It is for 4-part men's
chorus (or quartet) with organ and percussion (1 player on bass drum, tam
tam, and chime).
Lewis Worthington

I have a "Gloria" (8 minutes) for SATB chamber choir and marimba if you are
interested.
Dr. Timothy G. Cooper

Here's a few pieces:
- Mathias "Ceremony after a Fire Raid"
- Argento "I Hate and I Love"
- Forsyth "Music for Mouths, Marimba, Mbira and Rototoms"
Leonard Ratzlaff

David Maslanka, "Litany for Courage and the Seasons" (percussion and
clarinet).
Susa "Carols and Lullabies" (marimba, vibes, harp, guitar - ECS)
"Patapan", arr. Batastini (GIA) (flute, snare drum)
"Five Spanish Carols", arr Gregory Rose (we added various percussion,
worked great!) - publ. by Oxford, X311.
David Griggs-Janower

I have a piece (one of a set) that debuted this fall in Oregon that uses
chorus and percussion (just timpani and snare). It's a setting of a Walt
Whitman poem entitled, "Eighteen Sixty-One." It is spoken chorus - no
singing anywhere in it, but very effective.
Cecil Rigby

There's a great african mass called "Missa Lubba" for SATB a cappella and
percussion. I can't remember the author but I think it might be published
by Lawson -Gould.
John Michniewicz

"Lamdeni" by Lukas Foss - Salabert
"The Curse of Iron" (in Estonian, for one drummer only) by Tormis - Faber,
publisher
Harriet R. Simons

"The Lark" by Leonard Bernstein, written for Lillian Hellmann's play of
Joan of Arc's life, is wonderful wonderful wonderful! Also uses soprano and
countertenor solos.
Erica M. Lohmann

"Curse the Source of Delight" by Gordon Johnson - Timpani and Chorus -
intense, exciting. I did it with my HS choir in Berlin 10 years ago or so.
Gary Weidenaar

Dr. Larry Wyatt and I presented a session on music for choir and solo
instrument at the Southeastern ACDA convention last year that covered this
area. There were not many in this category but I hope what we found might
be of some help.
Bass Drum
Highly Recommended
- Tormis, Velio "Raua Needmine" Fazer 50019-9
Glockenspiel
Highly Recommended
- Hodkinson, Sydney "New Prince, New Pomp" Theodore Presser 342-40130
Recommended
- Jergenson, Dale "Lily of the Erabu Isle" Laurendale Associates CH-1096
Tubular Bells
Highly Recommended
- Field, Corey "Since on a Quiet Night" European American Music EA 775
- Hodkinson, Sydney "Masters in This Hall" Theodore Presser 342-40133
Percussion
Highly Recommended
- Hodkinson, Sydney "Missa Brevis" Theodore Presser 342-40127
- Mathias, William "Ceremony after a Fire Raid" Oxford University ISBN
019337434X
Recommended
- Daley, Eleanor "Hosanna, Loud Hosanna" Alliance Music AMP 0102
- Jergenson, Dale "Mbube" Laurendale Associates CH-1050
Snare Drum
Highly Recommended
- Hodkinson, Sydney "O Little Town of Bethlehem" Theodore Presser 342-40131
- Hodkinson, Sydney "Whence Come You, Shepherd Maiden?" Theodore Presser
342- 40128
All of these works are for mixed choir and some percussion instrument or
instruments. In order to be in our study they could only use one player.
Lanny McManus

The only piece I know of for that ensemble is Luigi Nono's "Liebeslied".
It's a wonderful piece.
Anthony Barrese

2 suggestions:
1. Ramirez' Missa Criolla - uses three percussionists, and a couple of
string players, maybe also a piano. Spicy rhythms for the SSATB choir to
sing - definitely not for beginners. 2 tenor soloists - lasts about 40
minutes. I believe. Choristers love singing it.
2. The medieval "carol" repertoire. "Carol" as in the sense of 'part song
with repeated burden' - for all festive occasions, not just Christmas.
Helen Climo

Musica Romanica publishes "Festum hibernum" (Festival of Winter) - Ancient
Cyclic Customs by Alexandru Pascanu, for SATB with divisi and percussion.
The piece brings together in a kaleidoscopic manner about 14 different
carols and musical customs related to the winter celebrations from Romania.
Neutral syllables account for easier learning. Recordings are available also.
Gabriel Dumitrescu

I believe the Penderecki Psalmen Davids calls for double chorus (one part
spoken) and percussion. It's an early work.
Fred Ford

My group just performed a super piece this fall that they loved and so did
I: "Let my people go" by Howard A. Roberts, copyright 1970, Schirmer
Publishing. A cappella with three percussionists.
Other pieces for choir and percussion by Roberts (also Schirmer) are "Steal
away", "Motherless child", "Sinner man", and "I want Jesus to walk with me".
Dr. Carole Clifford

If you can find a score - look at Dallapiccola's Canti di Prigionia - it
was written before his serious serial works, therefore, not too difficult.
It is based on the writings of three famous prisoners: Mary Stuart,
Girolamo de Savanorola and...? (I can't remember the third!).
Tom Merrill

Look at Argento's "I Hate and I Love"
L. Stukenhol

I bought a great compilation of Indigenous and Traditional South American
pieces when travelling in Peru 3 years ago. It is published by RICORDI,
which has offices in Argentina. The very last piece of "Danzas Indigenas
Argentinas" is a piece from Chile called "Fiesta araucana", and is arranged
for a collection of percussion instruments PLUS 3 voices, known simply as
'Voces agudas, medias y graves'. The notation doesn't use staves, just an
'approximation' of which direction the voices go in. I'd love to get this
piece performed myself, but as I teach in a very small outback Australian
town, it's not the best environment. I'm moving to Melbourne shortly so
hopefully I'll be able to get it 'off the ground' there.
David Perry

EarthSongs in San Fransisco publishes several pieces by African composers
which use hand drums (such as congas) and SATB choir a cappella. They have
an entire Roman Catholic Mass (in Latin) as well as several sacred and
secular works in African languages.
I have purchased review copies of all of the sacred works and the Mass. If
you are interested I could dig these out and give you the exact names and
octavo numbers.
Taking a look at these, they seem doable. The percussion is not at all
difficult. The vocal parts are tonal but rhythmically complex- I'd
characterize them as medium difficulty, but you may feel otherwise.
Jo Scheier

Here are some works for choir and percussion by Latin American composers:
- Alberto Luis da Cunha, b. 1959, Brasil: Rock, SATB, wordless, 4pp, pub.
by the Brazilian Center for the Diffusion of scores.
- Luis Antonio Escobar, b. 1925, Colombia: Los Hampones, SATB, solos.
- Maria Helena Rosas Fernandes, Brasil: Canto de Maricatu, SATB, 5 pp.
- Luis Gurge González, b. 1936, Mexico: Qhapay-raymi, SATB.
- Harold Gramatges, b. 1918, Cuba: Cantata para Abel, SATB, narrator.
- Joaquin Gutiérrez Heras, b. 1927, Mexico: De Profundis, SATB, piano, pub.
by Ediciones Mexicanas de Musica.
- Guido Haazen, Missa Luba, SATB, solo Tenor, 14:00, in Latin, pub.
Lawson-Gould, New York (Mr.Gould recommended this to me).
- Salvador Ranieri, b. 1930, Argentina: Oguno sta solo, SATB.
- Kilze Setti, b. 1832, Brasil: Lenda do céu, SATB, solo Mezzo-soprano, 48
pp, composed in 1962, manuscript at Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.
- Carlos Surinach, b. 1915, Spain. Canciones del alma, SATB, published
seperately by AMP (in US).
As far as I know I am keeping the only index of all Latin American choral
music. I have about 10,000 titles, bibliography, discography, etc. Pass the
word along to others so that I can help, and so that composers will send me
more information.
If you are looking for wonderful arrangements of popular music, Maria
Guinand at Schola Cantorum de Caracas is quite an expert. Percussion parts
ad lib. I have copies of some of the things in her library.
Suzanne Tiemstra

Try looking at Catulli Carmina by Carl Orff. Intense and very rythmic.
Cloudburst by Eric Whiteacre... I think that just uses percussion instruments.
Brian Dehn

I Hate and I Love - Domenic Argento
Electa - Jean Belmont
Charles Bruffy

How about Body Percussion? Try Gloria - 2 part w/body percussion - Greg A.
Lapp -bp920102. This highly rhythmic setting of the traditional latin text
employs claps, stomps, and finger snaps from the singers. Although listed
as 2 part, it was conceived as an ST-AB piece. A visceral and dynamic
statement of Glory to God.
For information on these and other works contact
Brosscum Publications

Here in Brasil there is a piece of Camargo Guarnieri, called Concerto por
String Orchestra, and Percussion. I know there is something for Choir and
percussion, but most of them are not written. The people here put the
percussion, mostly of afro-brasilian music, but nothing is written. I will
see if I can find some of those and if they are witten I will tell you.
Also brasilian pop music is done in the same way. There is a special
composer called Eduardo Carvalho that does many of those arrangements, and
he himself put the percussion. He has some books with his arrangements,
some are vey easy and some medium difficults, because he works with 'Corais
de Empresa', like Petrobras, IBAMA, Sebrae and others. His address is:
Eduardo Dias Carvalho:
SQS 414 - Bloco E - Apto. 105
Brasilia - DF - Brasil.
Tel.: (061) 346-1306 (In Brasilia - Brasil)
There is a Brasilian women composer called Kilza Setti that wrote a music
called "Jogo da condessa" for mixed Choir and Percussion. The copyright is
from Editora Novas Metas Ltda, in Sao Paulo, Brasil. The MUSIMED, Editora e
Distrbuidora Ltda, from Brasilia, has those musics too. The Address is:
Setor de Diversoes Sul, Ed. Venancio IV sala 106 - Brasilia - DF - Brasil -
Zip Code 70.300. The Caixa Postal is 7006 - Lago Sul - Z.C. 71.600 -
Brasilia - DF. His telephone is (061) 226-6820.
I know a piece called Domaredansen, from a Swedish Folksong, with
arrangment of Bengt Hallberg, that is written for percussion Choir and
piano. In fact it must be a set of drums (we call bateria) and he just says
the rythm is in Fast Boogie-woogie (with even eighths). The scores says
optional guitar, bass and drum parts available separetely. Therefore I
think there is possibility to get the whole written. It is a very
interesting and excelent piece to end a program for example. The public get
crazy with that. It is like a kind of jazz piece. The text is in english
and the edition is a copyright of Sveriges Körförbunds Förlag, Stockholm,
and for the English laguages edition the Walton Music Corporation, New York.
Emilio Cesar de Carvalho

The following was on the list a while back.
- Bernstein: Missa Brevis
- David Gillingham: Return to Innocence; publ. Moon of Hope
- Argento: I hate and I love
- Stravinsky: Les Noces (piano as perc?)
- Orff: Carmina Burana (piano/percussion)
- Susa: Carols and Lullabies (marima, vibes, harp, guitar - ECS)
- Batastini, arr.: (GIA) Patapan (flute, snare, drum)
- Gregory Rose, arr.: Five Spanish Carols (perc. can be added) - Oxford X311
- John Gardner: Tomorrow shall be my dancing day (tamb, drum) - OUP
- Perischetti: Winter Cantata (SSAA, marimba, flute)
- Leavitt: Hodie
- Steve Barnett: Go tell it on the mountain (various options) - B&H OCTB6396
- V. Nelhybel: Estampie Natalie
- W.H. Parry: To Bethlehem (adaptable to avail. forces) - OUP
- Z. Randall Stroope: Hodie (large instr. forces plus children¹s chorus) -
Mark Foster
- Lloyd Pfautsch: Dancing day (fl, ob, bsn, perc.)
- Betelehemu (African Xmas, congas, bongos, shakers, claves) -Lawson Gould
- Dave and Iola Brubeck: God's Love made visible
- Alexandru Pascanu: Festum hibernum: Ancient Cyclic Customs (Festival of
Winter) (satb w. divisi, perc.: sonagli, frusta, campane) - Musica Romanica
- Wendell Whalum: Betelehemu (adaptable to forces) - Lawson-Gould 52647
- Malcolm V. Edwards: Tomorrow shall be my dancinc day (GV Thompson VA4019)
- R. Kauffman: African Noel (Elkan-Vogel 362-03288) SSATBB (opt. perc.)
- Arnold Freed: Where were you bron, O holy child (B&H 5620) (opt. perc.)
- Alice Parker: 3 Carols to play and sing (hand-bells or chimes, triangle,
woodblock, tamb., cymbal, tenor drum, org.): 1. In Bethlehem (2779 -
Boosey?), 2. I saw a stable (2780), 3. Shrill Chanticleer (2781).
- David McIntyre: Personent Hodie (2 fl, hand drum) (Thomas House)
- Innumerable Spanish Villancicos can use ad lib perc.
- Ariel Ramirez: Misa Criolla (colorful mix of Latin American perc.)
- Lloyd Pfautsch: A Day for Dancing (winds and percussion)
- Ronald Kauffmann: African Noel (wood block and bongos) (Elkan-Vogel
362-03288)
- Gregory Rose, arr.: Five Spanish Carols (percussion) (Oxford, X311)
- Batastini, arr.: Patapan (flute, snare drum) (GIA)
- John Mochnik: Three Medieval Carols (Mark Foster)
- Ben Alaway: Three Christmas Villancicos (harp/piano and percussion)
(Santa Barbara)
- John Rutter: Tomorrow shall be my dancing day (percussion)
- Dede Duson: The Wind for SATB and timpani.
- Ben Allaway: Bandari (African) (Santa Barbara)
- David Fanshawe: African Sanctus (Hal Leonard) (prerecorded tape, and
optional electric instruments as well as percussion
- Ron Nelson: Psalm 95 Come Let Us Praise Yahwey
- Andre Thomas: Keep Your Lamps (tri-tom, finger cymbals, etc.)
- Andre Thomas: African Noel
- Lou Harrison: La Koro Sutro for SATB and Gamelan
- Peter Hallock: Gloria (Walton pub.) - (3 percussionists, piano)
- Ernst Toch: Waltz for 'talking choir' and percussion
- Penderecki: Psalms of David
- Brent Pierce: Beat Beat Drums
- Peter Hallock: Gloria in Excelsis Deo (extended 3-movement work)
- Forsyth: "Music for Mouths, Marimba, Mbira and Rototoms"
- Mathias: "Ceremony after a Fire Raid"
- Abraham Kaplan: Psalm settings (and other works)
- Rutter: Magnificat
- Eric Whitacre: "Cloudburst" for SATB divisi choir, two sets of orch.
bells (or handbells), thunder sheet, bass drum, piano, clapping
- Donald Erb: God Love You Now (Merion 342-40099)
Alexander Ruggieri

I suggest Susa: Lullabies and Carols, calls for several percussion.
Spanish Carol melodies
Carol Longsworth

-------------------------------
Clifford Wagner
Camerata Vocal Arsis
Rio Cuarto, Cba., Argentina


Dear Listers,

Thank you for a wealth of repertoire! Below is the compilation of your
replies re. music scored for chorus and percussion. Some people included
works that also have piano, so I put those in a separate section.

I. VOICES ALONE PLUS PERCUSSION

from Ben Allaway:
Please see my website under ethnic percussion. Some pieces call for
multiple drums, but most can be successful with just one drum. I have an
extraordinary piece yet to be premiered or I would send that. It is for ATB
and percussion, involving dirt thrown on a drum, describing Iraqi refugees
making their way. Intense poem in the Nicois dialect (half french half
italian). I'll check with this trio in France to see when they can let
other groups do it. It would work fine in a small group like yours with all
women on the alto.
____________________________

from Wallace DePue:
MOBILE, THE (for 12 or more voices in any combination) is a contemporary
piece using minimalism for at least twelve voices for twelve voice parts.
The effect that its performance has on an audience is marvelous, because the
piece is so unique. A "mobile" is a dangling art work that is sensitive to
whatever currents of air are present. The text is:

Walking faster! We can run, traveling to get there. Walking? Fascinating!
Traveling? Run! We can!
The contrast that "Mobile" provides in a choral program is most effective.
Foot-stomping and educator tone bells with good choreography can make this
piece stunning. A world premiere is needed for "The Mobile." The piece is
appropriate for any age group of performers. The written vocal range is:
Db1-c2. (1:18) MEDIUM to DIFFICULT
____________________________

from Karl Henning:
I have a piece which NEARLY matches your request; Lux Nova Press carries my
raucous Timbrel & Dance:

http://www.luxnova.com/lnpwebstore/pi/lnp/0165.html

The SATB writing could be capably handled by your group, but the percussion
really takes three people. So if you could recruit a couple pair hands more.
It is a virtuosic piece, and would be stunning with a crack group such as
your own.
____________________________

from Gene Morlan:
By all means you should take a look at two arrangements by Crawford
Gates--Oh My Luve's Like a Red, Red Rose and Annie Laurie. They are lush,
with as many as 12 parts in My Luve and 7 in Annie Laurie.

They are published by Thomas House Publications, P.O. Box 6023, Concord,
Calif. 94520 (Tel. 415-933-5282). I don't know if Thomas House is still in
business but surely some publisher has taken over their catalog. Your local
music dealer should be able to find out for you.

My copy of My Luve also indicates the sole sales agent was Roger Dean Pub.
Co., 324 West Jackson St., Macomb, Ill. 61455 (Tel. 309-833-2207).

I hope this helps and that you can find a source. Best wishes.
____________________________

from Nina Gilbert:
1. You probably know Betelehemu, the Nigerian Christmas song by Babatunde
Olatunji. My advice on that: buy the original TTBB (Lawson Gould 52647,
now owned by Belwin / Warner Bros. / AOL Time
Warner !), and adapt the voicing of the chords for your ensemble. Also, buy
the best recording of this piece by going to www.morehouse.edu.

2. Sinner Man, spiritual adapted/arranged by Howard Roberts. Published by
Lawson Gould (etc. as above! LG 51571) as SATB (easy divisi) plus two solos
plus a really boring percussion part. We divided the solos among nine
singers (some represent the sinner, some represent God), and our two
percussionists improvised different patterns for each verse.

It's worth looking at Samuel Barber's "A Stopwatch and an ordnance map."
TTBB plus three timpani. Not your voicing, but the sort of magnificent
piece you would love. I think the four voices don't divide, and I think
there's a high tenor solo near the end.

If you want to balance doing the Barber with the men by having the women
sing something too, there are some pieces for women and percussion
commissioned by Patricia Hennings and the Peninsula Women's Chorus published
by Earthsongs or by Treble Clef Music Press. I think the percussion pieces
are with Earthsongs. I don't know the details offhand, but you should be
able to find them from this description.

The men's and women's pieces may require bigger ensembles, but they're at
least worth looking at.
___________________

from Harriet Simons:
Have you done Veljo Tormis' Curse Upon Iron?? That's the most exciting
piece I know for chorus/one drum.
___________________

from Gabriel Dumitrescu:
A piece of interest would be "Festum hibernum" by Alexandru Pascanu for
SATB, divisi, soloists, percussion. Published by Musica Romanica, cat#
XRCM-0020. Performance Audio Tape and perusal copy available.
___________________

from Christopher Marshall (New Zealand):
I have several 8-9 part pieces, sacred and secular, and much of it actually
sounds better with one (or a couple) of voices per part. There is an anthem
'Levavi Oculos Meos', two songs from 'To The Horizon', a short piece
'Nobody' and several other possibilities.

Apart from 'Earth Song' a 3 part SASASA canon - with three tambourines – and
male voice doubling optional (to make 12 voices!) I have nothing for voice
and percussion alone.

Please let me know if any of these sound interesting and I will send you pdf
perusal scores.
___________________

from Meg Collins Stoop:
I have written a piece for SATB choir and vibraphone and marimba, and I
would be grateful if you would consider it in your programming. The piece,
entitled "Gnosis," sets the poem by transcendentalist poet, Christopher
Pearse Cranch. The text is spiritual in nature yet not confined to a
consideration of any one religious construct or doctrine. It speaks
ecstatically of the time of our passing, "when our souls are fed by the
Fount which gave them birth,... when by inspiration led," we will be joined
with all that is.
The seven and a half minute piece begins with the stark setting of the
opening line of the poem, “Thought is deeper than all speech,” in a
mood-setting stage whisper. As the layers of whispers become more intense,
the vibraphone sneaks into the texture, chiming the first pitches of the
opening melodic motive. The next line, “Feeling deeper than all thought,” is
suddenly emotional, with the first full four part texture and dynamic swell.
The stage whispers return with the setting of the line “We are spirits,” and
the pentatonic harmonies take a chromatic dip with the completion of the
thought: “We are spirits clad in veils.”
As the piece progresses, the ecstatic dance of Sufis is evoked with a
section that is both very rhythmic and melodically minimalistic. This
evolves into a frenzied section of bitonality, representing our perceived
individuality and aloneness here on earth. After playful word painting with
the line, “We like parted drops or rain,” the two pitch centers, E and F
sharp, finally resolve in a joyous union on F, “melting, flowing, into one.”
_______________________

from Nicholas Petersen:
1. Hist Whist by R. W. Jones (Shawnee Press, #A 1076) - for spoken choir and
percussion. It is in no way a serious piece, taken from the poem by e.e.
cummings. You can use a trap set and triangle with one player for the piece
(per the note at the bottom of the first page). It is a text more
appropriate for Hallowe'en ("look for the old woman with the wart on her
nose, what she'll do to you nobody knows"). The music is not sung, but
pitched, so that there is a sense of rise and fall within the "melody". I am
doing it with middle schoolers to help them learn rhythm and to use their
voices in new and creative ways, but I'm sure that it would at least get a
laugh from an audience if a professional choir did it!

2. Epitaph for Moonlight - R. Murray Schafer, and I'm sure that it can be
ordered through J.W. Pepper. It's scored for 16 voices, but you can limit
it to as many as you'd like. I'm doing it with 18 with my high school
Chamber Singers. Though it can be performed a capella, there is a percussion
part written at the bottom of the page. The piece is aleatoric, written in
1968. It uses non-standard notation (a la Penderecki's "Threnody to the
Victims of Hiroshima") and is really very fascinating with the number of
sounds that the singers have to produce. It demands attentive listening
skills on the part of the ensemble.
_________________________

from Dennis Smith:
May I suggest "O Sifuni Mungu". It is an 8-part piece arranged by David
Maddux with a short soprano solo. It is an Swahili version of "All Creatures
of Our God and King", and switches between Swahili and English. As for
percussion, it has a main percussion part consisting of 3-4 instruments that
can be handled by (1) percussionist but depending on the point that you are
in the song, you might want to have some of the simpler parts played by one
or more singers, which we did when we performed the piece last year. The
publisher is Word Music & we have a recording of the piece, if you are
interested in hearing it.
_________________________

from Vladimir Silva:
I did the premiere of "Noite Morta" for soprano and tenor solo, SATB chorus
and percussion. This piece was written by Liduino Pitombeira for my DMA
recital at LSU. If you want to hear it, please, visit my website
(www.vladimirsilva.com). It is under musica – Noite Morta. In addition, I
have another piece by Eli-Eri Moura (also a Brazilian composer). His
composition is the Psalm 150 for SATB chorus and percussion. It is a
wonderful piece. If you are interested, please, let me know.
_________________________

from Charles Q. Sullivan:
Antol Dorati mass for voices (divisi) and percussion (tuned metal
plates)
Virgil Thompson - can't remember the title - available SSAA or SATB
Bernstein - Choruses from the Lark (Latin and French - divisi
w/countertenor solo)
Do you consider piano a persussion instrument? In combination with other
percussion, that opens up some more wonderful repertoire.
_________________________

from Ray Evans Harrell:
Have you checked out the Ned Rorem choral repertoire?
_________________________

from Kerry Krebill:
Do you know Bernstein's "Choruses from The Lark"? It needs two
percussionists, but maybe the extra baritone (is that you??) could play one?
(they aren't hard). It's a cool piece, half French, half Latin (he
refashioned the Latin part into a Mass) and needs a counter-tenor/alto to be
Joan of Arc. You probably know it already, but it popped immediately to
mind.
_________________________

from Simon Carrington:
Jean Belmont's "Electa" written for the Kansas City Chorale – a wonderful
piece

II. VOICES, PIANO, AND PERCUSSION

from Ross Bernhardt:
Peter Hallock's "Gloria in excelsis Deo" published by Walton -- Really
great 3-movement work for SATB (some divisi), piano and percussion.
Assymetrical meter, cool harmonies, etc.
____________________________

from Pat Maimone (formerly at West Point's Post Chapel):

Try Abraham Kaplan's So the Sun Stood Still. it has some marvelous
percussion parts, including piano or organ. An earlier one is "Shepherd
Me, Lord" for G. Kingsley, I think, for SATB, piano and drums.
_________________________

from Martin Banner:
The piece that comes to mind is Penderecki's "Aus den Psalmen Davids", which
I conducted way back on one of my Master's degree recitals at Temple
University. The instrumentation goes a little beyond your limitations...the
addition of piano (perhaps two pianos, it's been so long), one string bass,
and perhaps the need for one or two additional percussionists. I believe
this is one of the last "traditional" works that Penderecki wrote prior to
his avant garde period in the 60's. In fact, I believe the Psalms of David
piece won him a prize in a composition contest in Poland. There are 3 Psalms
set here, using, among other things, atonal music, quasi gregorian
chant...definitely worth your while to look at.

Here endeth the compilation.

Much obliged,
Jonathan
_____________________
Jonathan Miller
Founder and Artistic Director
Chicago a cappella
JMiller(a)chicagoacappella.org
2936 N. Southport Ave., 2nd floor
Chicago, IL 60657-4120 USA
best phone: 708-383-4337 (home office)
administrative office: 773-281-7820
www.chicagoacappella.org


--
Original message:



We have an outstanding percussion ensemble here at the University of North
Alabama, and we are always looking for collaborative works between their
ensemble and our choruses. Their instrumental resources include marimbas,
congas, djembes, various hand percussion instruments, and the like. Works
for male and female choruses would be welcome too. Also: suggestions about
adding percussion to a given piece would be useful (beyond typical things
like adding a drum kit to a pop piece).



Here are the responses—thanks to all who wrote in! -Ian Loeppky



-------------------------



a few repertoire thoughts:

Dallapiccolo - Canti di Prigionia

Messiaen - Trois petites liturgies de la divine presence



Three impressions Beecroft, Norma (1934-) [Canada]

Publisher : Canadian Music Centre [Canada] Ref. : MV 6231 B414th Type of
choir : SATB (4 mixed voices ) Instruments : Piano (1) ; Percussion Text in
English



Hymn of creation Coulthard, Jean (1908-2000) [Canada]

Publisher : Canadian Music Centre [Canada] Ref. : MV 6220 C855hy Type of
choir : SATB (4 mixed voices ) Instruments : Percussion



Clear sky and thunder by Henderson, Ruth Watson (1932-) [Canada] Publisher :
Canadian Music Centre [Canada] Ref. : MV 6251 H497cl Instruments : Flute (1)
; Piano (1) ; Percussion



SEVEN GHOSTS by Larsen, Libby

Text by : Wheathley, Phillis (1754?-1784) - Lind, Jenny (1820-1887) - Payne,
John Howard (1791-1852) - Thombaugh, Clyde (1906-1997) - Lindbergh, Charles
(1902-1974) - Armstrong, Louis (1901-1971) Publisher : Oxford University
Press [Great Britain] , 1998 Copyright : 1998, Oxford University Press Type
of choir : SATB (4 mixed voices ) Soloists : 1 Instruments : Piano (1) ;
Percussion



-----------------------



Regarding your notice on Choral-list, I know that British composer Paul
Ayres some pieces for percussion and voices, they might be suitable?



His website is www.paulayres.co.uk



------------------------



Stravinsky Les Noces, also 4 great pianists needed.

Orff Carmina Burana in his arrangement for 2 pianos and perc.

Any number of arrangements of African music

Andre Thomas' African-inspired works. (Keep Your Lamps)



-------------------------



Look at BANDARI: Inside These Walls by Ben Allaway, published by Santa
Barbara Music Publishing.

25 mins, plus additional recessional "From This House", a separate octavo.



Great percussion parts for as many as six players. Variety of African
styles. Google the work for more info.



--------------------------



"A stopwatch and an ordnance map" (Samuel Barber?) for TTBB, tenor solo, and
(I think) timpani.



If you have a flute:

"Winter Cantata" (Persichetti) for SSAA, flute, and marimba. There's a
"selection" of three movements from this published, but I would make your
own selection of movements.



---------------------------



There are a number of works for men's chorus that use percussion. Probably
the most famous is Samuel Barber's "Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map."



A number of works by the Estonian composer Veljo Tormis also employ
percussion, including "The Singer," and "God, Protect us from War."



There's a great new work we're premiering in June by Bob Chilcott called "5
Ways to Kill a Man." Oxford will publish it eventually.



You can also go to musicanet.org and search their comprehensive database for
pieces for various choral ensembles + percussion.



-----------------------------



Look at "Winter Images" by Parker

It is a four-movement set. Absolutely delightful



-----------------------------



*GOOBER PEAS (TTBB / barbershop quartet / percussion: two paper-covered hair
combs, cider jug, slide whistle, washboard and two spoons) is an arrangement
of a Civil War song about peanuts, a staple food for Confederate soldiers.
The vocal ranges are: Tenors, c-A1; Basses, G#-b. (2:30) MEDIUM to DIFFICULT



ANIMAL FUGUE, THE is all Sprechstimme (spoken) in four voices, and may be
done by any choir. Audiences respond to it wildly! The piece is in four
parts: 1) Teacher, 2) Kitty Kat, 3) Rooster, and 4) snake. A free CD
containing the piece and a score of it are available upon request. (1:30)
EASY



-------------------------------



I have written a piece setting the poem "Gnosis" by transcendentalist poet
(and editor of The Dial) Christopher Pearse Cranch. It is scored for SATB,
vibraphone and marimba. It begins with whispers from the chorus.

I'd be happy to send you a perusal copy if you are interested.

Sincerely,

Margaret Collins Stoop



-------------------------------



We'd like to send you a sample copy of "Two Songs of Welcome" for SSA,
flute,

and percussion (no piano), in response to your message of today to
ChoraList.

It's been done by Mt Holyoke (college choir). The "Two Songs" are but two of


six settings which form a suite, "You whose day it is, make it beautiful" by


Dan Kingman; the texts are from Native American sources.



--------------------------------



Look at Milhaud's "Les Choéphores". It also requires a virtuoso French
speaker (female). The choral parts are great for someone interested in vocal
percussion.



----------------------------------



I have a piece for mixed chorus, 5 percussionists, and piano called "We Are
the Choir." A bit of it can be found at
http://www.jdavidmoore.net/mixed.html, but I'd be happy to send you a
complete perusal score if you'd like. It's only been performed once.



I'd also look at "A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map" by Barber, which calls
for men's chorus and timpani.



-----------------------------------



I'm doing E Oru O this semester. There's an ensemble which includes djembe,
shekere, congas, tambourine, igede, etc. in the Hal Leonard Rosephanye
Powell version (which I'm doing) or the Henry Leck version.



-------------------------------------



Take a look at www.earthsongsmus.com. It is a small publishing company for
music from around the world, and a lot of it involves percussion to one
extent or another. The problem I have encountered is finding music that is
challenging for the percussionists. It seems like a lot of it requires
little more than banging repetitively on a drum. If you or your students
have some chops for arranging, take a look at some of Paul Simon's music. I
haven't found any that is published, but I have written out the parts. His
stage performances involve a whole flock of African percussionists and
singers.



------------------------------------



There is a wonderful work by Canadian composer Ruth Watson Henderson called
"Voices of Earth", set for 2 pianos, or 2 pianos and percussion (it was done
by Nexus) or orchestra. The choral forces are large choir, chamber choir and
children's choir. The entire work is about 25 minutes, I believe, but might
be longer. It was commissioned for the Amadeus Choir, the Elmer Iseler
Singers and The Bach Children's Chorus, and premiered with Elmer Iseler
conducting, and Lydia Adams and Ruth Watson Henderson at the pianos.



I think there is a two pianos and percussion arrangement of "Chichester
Psalms" also.



-------------------------------------



My chorus is performing the Schnittke Requiem this weekend--choir, trumpet,
trombone, electric guitars, organ, piano, celeste, timpani, chimes, bells,
tamtam, bass drum, marimba, vibraphone, drum set, etc.

It's a fabulous work. I think it's one of the major works of the

twentieth century. Schnittke knew what he was doing, so the voice leading
makes sense even in tone clusters. For full disclosure, some of my singers
aren't enthusiastic. But most of them really like it.



-------------------------------------



Les Noces (Svadebka), Stravinsky

I Hate and I Love, Argento

Canti di Prigionia, Dallapiccola



--------------------------------------



Fin . . .

_________________________________

Ian Loeppky, D.M.A.

Artistic Director, Florence Camerata

Assistant Professor, Director of Choral Activities

University of North Alabama

Box 5040, Florence, AL 35632-0001

256.765.4515 (office), 256.765.4995 (fax), 1-800-TALKUNA x4515 (toll free)

Email: irloeppky(a)una.edu

Website: http://www2.una.edu/music/faculty/loeppky.html










on January 22, 2004 10:00pm
A superb listing with exciting ideas for new repertoire! Thank you.
May I suggest two other works for choir and percussion?

Firstly, there is Leonard Bernstein Missa Brevis, for SSAATTBB, Countertenor Solo and Incidental Percussion (2 timpani, two sets of bells, cymbal, tam-tam, hand-drum, tabor, tambourine). A very lively piece (great effect of the bells in the Gloria!). It lasts approx. 12 minutes.

Secondly, following the suggestion of taking the piano as a percussion instrument, I would recommend Luigi Dallapicola's Canti di Prigiona (Songs from Prison)-- three extremely moving (but also extremely difficult!) pieces on Latin texts. The scoring is actually for 2 pianos, 2 harps (mostly used in a percussive way), timpani, bells and percussion. The 3 songs last about 25 minutes taken together; the second is for women's voices only. There is a masterful recording featuring the Swedish Radio Choir + Eric Ericson Chamber Choir, conducted by Esa-Pekka Salonen. The score is published by Nuova Carisch (Milan).

Antoine Caz
on August 8, 2004 10:00pm
Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 12:46:57 -0400
From: Lanny McManus
To: choralist@lists.colorado.edu
Subject: Music for Choir & Solo Instrument

During the weeks leading up to the regional ACDA conventions we asked
Choralist members for help in compiling a list of favorite works for one
solo instrument and choir with or without keyboard. At the same time we
had contacted all the publishers we could find and asked for music that fit
our topic and used the Musica database to compile as comprhensive a list as
possible of these works.

Those listed as highly recommended are works of high artistic merit while
Those listed as recommended are works that are good but might best be used
in a specific situation, most often in a church setting.

Larry D. Wyatt
Lanny R. McManus

Music for Solo Instruments and Choir
* Denotes Choralist Favorite

Composer, Choir, Title, Pub., Pub. #.

Percussion Total Received 7
Highly Recommended
Hodkinson, Sydney, Mixed, Missa Brevis, Theodore Presser, 342-40127.
Mathias, William, Mixed, Ceremony After a Fire Raid, Oxford, ISBN 019337434X.

Recommended
Daley, Eleanor, Mixed, Hosanna, Loud Hosanna, Alliance Music, AMP 0102.
Arr. Jergenson, Dale, Mixed, Mbube, Laurendale Associates, CH-1050.

Snare Drum Total Received 3
Highly Recommended
Hodkison, Sydney, Mixed, O Little Town of Bethlehem, Theodore Presser,
342-40131.
Hodkison, Sydney, Mixed, Whence Come You, Shepherd Maiden?, Theodore
Presser, 342-40128.
McCray, James, Treble, A Jubilant Song, Santa Barbara Music, SBMP 31.

Bass Drum Total Received 1
Highly Recommended
Tormis, Velio, Raua Needmine, Fazer, 50019-9.

Glockenspiel Total Received 3
Highly Recommended
Hodkinson, Sydney, Mixed, New Prince, New Pomp, Theodore Presser, 342-40130.

Recommended
Jergenson, Dale, Mixed, Lily of the Erabu Isle, Laurendale Associates, CH-1096.

Tubular Bells Total Received 2
Highly Recommended
Field, Corey, Mixed, Since on a Quiet Night, European American Music, EA 775.
Hodkinson, Sydney, Mixed, Masters in This Hall, Theodore Presser, 342-40133.


Choralist Favorites Not On List

Percussion
Penderecki, , , Psalms of David.
Sindar, Ron, , Medusa the Ship.

Timpani
Barber, Samuel, Male, A Stopwatch and an Ordinace Map.