Advertise on ChoralNet 
ChoralNet logo
The mission of the ACDA is to inspire excellence in choral music through education, performance, composition, and advocacy.

Learning from Eric Ericson IX - Wrap-up

Eric Ericson is one of the giants of our field and his work has been a model for many others: in his enthusiasm for performing and commissioning new music, in raising standards in a cappella singing, as a teacher, and as a conductor. His ensembles (Chamber Choir, Swedish Radio Choir, and Orphei Drängar) became models of their type and their recordings are likely to live on.

For me personally, it's been fun to look back at my own experiences with Eric and talk to Swedish friends who've worked with him closely. Looking back at these interviews, the following are significant aspects of his work and success:

  • curiosity - about music of all kinds and periods, for new music, for better ways of achieving excellence - this is something we can all emulate - it's a huge reason for his success - he did an enormous amount of new music and constantly encouraged composers to write for the medium of a cappella choir
  • his concern for getting it right (and being willing to work--and work the choir!--until he did)
  • his superb piano skills and his way of communicating through the keyboard to his ensembles - this is not something all of us can do, but for those who have great skill as a pianist, his use of the keyboard can provide a model for a way to work . . . and all of us can learn to play and give pitches in a way that supports beautiful choral sound, rather than call forth harsh and un-vocal ones
  • his conducting technique - while one may not want or be able to copy Eric's exact technique, his concern with mastering technical elements of conducting and (more importantly) making sure the body reflects what a singer needs to sing well should concern all of us -- as Stefan Parkman said, "He wanted to wave his arms and hands in such a way that it allows the singers to produce the sound."
  • the choral sound he developed came out of working for clarity, balance, and beautiful intonation - that he did this with big, well-trained voices helped define a new standard
  • his joy and love for music - as Arne Lundmark said, "In the concert itself I often had the feeling that all his love to music suddenly was shown and we were willing to give him all he asked for." 
Here's a summary of the series in one place:
IV - Eric on conducting technique I (notes from several sessions I observed)
V - Eric on conducting technique II (notes from continued sessions)
 
This is my last post of the academic year -- see  you again in the fall!
on May 22, 2014 1:48pm
Thank you for this series! And thank you for including a list of the entire series in one place. For those interested, you can also read a supplementary column by Richard Sparks on Eric Ericson in the June/July issue of Choral Journal titled "The Piano in Rehearsal: A Tool or a Crutch?" (see page 63)
on May 23, 2014 2:33pm
Thanks, Amanda. This one was a pleasure to do!